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Regina

Regina was laid down in Harland and Wolff's Belfast yard for the Dominion Line in 1913, and was the first of six new class of vessel for the International Merchant Marine Co., and the Holland America Line.

Regina was launched on April 19th, 1917, and was completed as a troopship the following year. During this period of trooping, Regina operated with a single funnel and a basic passenger superstructure. In the December of 1918, Regina operated between Liverpool and Boston, repatriating troops and emigrants.

In the August of 1920, Regina was no longer required as a troopship, and returned to Harland and Wolff in order to be completed to her original specification.

On March 2nd, 1922, Regina underwent her sea trials, and then left for Liverpool.

On March 16th, 1922, Regina made her 'maiden voyage' in Dominion Line livery on the White Star-Dominion Line Joint Service between Liverpool and Portland, Maine.

In the February of 1923, Regina made her one and only visit to Bermuda, en-route to New York, landing naval replacements there.

Regina is credited with being the first ship to undergo the first Tourist Class experiment in 1924.

In 1925, Regina was placed on the Antwerp to New York route. In December of that year, Regina, along with other Dominion Line ships, was transferred to the White Star Line, along with a repaint into White Star Line colours. This marked the end of the Dominion Line. The service then became the White Star Line (Canadian Service).

On December 12th, 1925, Regina made her first White Star Line sailing between Liverpool and New York.

In the December of 1929, Regina was transferred to the Red Star Line, however, she was owned by Frederick Leyland & Co. She was refitted to accommodate 350 in cabin class, 350 in tourist class and 800 in third, and placed on the Antwerp, Southampton and New York route.

Early the following year, Regina underwent a change of name, and became Westernland, but continued to serve on the same route.

Westernland was laid-up in 1934, and on the first day of 1935, the Red Star service between Antwerp and New York came to an end. Westernland was then purchased by Arnold Bernstein's Red Star Line GmbH, and refitted to carry 550 in tourist class. Westernland also became one of the first car transporters between Europe to the U.S. On New Year's Eve, she crew of a French trawler that was sinking, the Satanile.

On November 8th, 1936, Westernland came to the aid of yet another vessel, the Hamburg America Line's Isis, which sank in a storm off Land's End.

In 1938, Westernland found herself laid-up once more at the end of summer season.

In June, 1939 Westernland was purchased by the Holland America Line when they bought Arnold Bernstein's Red Star Line GmbH, but she contined on the same route, and with the same name.

In the April of 1940, Westernland escaped to Britain after the German invasion of The Nederlands. On May 10th, Westernland became the headquarters ship for the exiled Dutch Government, and was docked at Falmouth. In July, Westernland was converted at Liverpool for trooping duties.

In the November of 1942, Westernland was purchased by the Admiralty for conversion to a repair ship.

Westernland became a destroyer depot ship in 1943.

Westernland was decommisioned in 1945, and was temporaily managed by Cunard White Star Line, with the aim of being rebuilt for their Canadian service, which was only operating with one ship. Because of her age, he idea was thrown-out, and Westernland was laid-up in the River Blackwater.

In the October of 1946, Westernland was sold to Christian Salveson in order to be coverted into a whaling depot shop, but this idea was also abandoned due to the work involved.

On the 15th July, 1947, Westernland was sold to BISCO for breaking, and was scrapped on the 1st August at Blythe.

 

 

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