First Officer Murdoch

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Re: First Officer Murdoch

Postby Achmet Pamba » Thu Jan 31, 2013 6:19 pm

Salaam, Ioannis.

My Moody account is from the St. Louis Globe-Democrat of April 20th but was datelined April 19th. I've looked at the interview again with a magnifying glass, and I'm positive it says J.H. Moody instead of J.R.

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Re: First Officer Murdoch

Postby williammurdoch.net » Fri Feb 01, 2013 8:30 pm

Achmet Pamba wrote:Salaam, Ioannis.

My Moody account is from the St. Louis Globe-Democrat of April 20th but was datelined April 19th. I've looked at the interview again with a magnifying glass, and I'm positive it says J.H. Moody instead of J.R.

Achmet


Achmet, that is most interesting. Is it possible to get a copy of this, as I will shortly be updating information on the mysterious J R or J H Moody on my website. And of course happy to credit your help :-)

Many thanks

Dan
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Re: First Officer Murdoch

Postby Achmet Pamba » Sat Feb 02, 2013 1:52 am

Salaam, Dan.

I'll try to photograph the account for you sometime this weekend. (I don't own a scanner, since they don't make extension cords long enough to stretch all the way from Hafiz to Wadi Hafalfa.) ;-)

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Re: First Officer Murdoch

Postby Aly Jones » Sat Feb 02, 2013 2:01 am

That is most interesting. Where did you find the evidence that he was about to be captain? I'd be most interested to see that, as it is the first time I have heard of it. He was almost chief officer for the voyage... except for Wilde's return. I think it would have been some years before he could have become captain.

Hi Dan, I am not a professional Titanic researcher, though, I've been on Titanic forums for many years now and I took in bits and pieces from many members. Smith was about to retire and Murdoch was one step closer to being a captain. Also, Murdoch's family history was seafaring. Many of his male relatives were indeed captains, and I think he was heading for that path if Murdoch was not killed on April 14th /15th 1912. I only new this because I remember what others had posted many years ago.
From wiki-
Murdoch was born in Dalbeattie in Dumfries and Galloway, Scotland, the fourth son of Captain Samuel Murdoch, a master mariner, and Jane Muirhead, six of whose children survived infancy. The Murdochs were a long and notable line of Scottish seafarers who sailed the world's oceans as early as the 19th century; William's father and grandfather were both sea captains as were four of his grandfather's brothers.


I am not sure if you could call his wife Ada a "young wife" -they were both the same age actually. Am also interested to know how you know they were planning to have a family? I know she expressed disappointment about not having children, but that was in hindsight.Come to think of it, you are right, she was unable to have children.

I'm sorry, you are right, I am wrong. As you quoted, she was unable to have any children.
"Quit Ye Like Men, Be Strong"
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Re: First Officer Murdoch

Postby williammurdoch.net » Sat Feb 02, 2013 2:06 am

Hi Achmet

That would be great and much appreciated. I tried looking for the article on-line without success... however I did come across another article which mentions the helmsman was none other than "J.H.L Moody"....! (The Yakima Herald., April 24, 1912, Page 5) Can send it to you and/or will be on my website soon. The plot thickens...

Regards from England,
Dan
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Re: First Officer Murdoch

Postby Ioannis Georgiou » Sat Feb 02, 2013 5:33 pm

Achmet Pamba wrote:Salaam, Ioannis.

My Moody account is from the St. Louis Globe-Democrat of April 20th but was datelined April 19th. I've looked at the interview again with a magnifying glass, and I'm positive it says J.H. Moody instead of J.R.

Achmet


williammurdoch.net wrote:Hi Achmet

That would be great and much appreciated. I tried looking for the article on-line without success... however I did come across another article which mentions the helmsman was none other than "J.H.L Moody"....! (The Yakima Herald., April 24, 1912, Page 5) Can send it to you and/or will be on my website soon. The plot thickens...

Regards from England,
Dan


Thanks to you both. I am afraid I did not have any of the two papers.
Interestingly in one newspaper I came across "3rd officer Robert H. Lightroller". Possibly a mix of Hichens & Lightoller?
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Re: First Officer Murdoch

Postby Peppermint » Sun Mar 10, 2013 5:16 am

Very interesting article. Anything about Murdoch interests me : )
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Re: First Officer Murdoch

Postby Countess » Mon Jul 29, 2013 11:13 pm

I have been wondering about Murdoch's death for a year now. And i really do wonder if Murdoch took his own life or not. I've been meaning to do some research on him
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Re: First Officer Murdoch

Postby shipbuilder » Wed Aug 14, 2013 7:17 pm

I doubt it very much. If any of them had suicidal feelings, no need to shoot themselves - just remain aboard and then when the ship sank, not make any effort to survive!
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Re: First Officer Murdoch

Postby Achmet Pamba » Thu Aug 15, 2013 11:54 am

On the other hand, Murdoch might have decided to grant himself a mercifully-swift end rather than suffer a slow, agonizing death in the freezing water.
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Re: First Officer Murdoch

Postby shipbuilder » Thu Aug 15, 2013 3:55 pm

It would all be over very quickly although it is a great shock to fall into freezing water. I have not done it from a sinking ship, but I did fall into a freezing lake in the middle of winter whilst wearing my naval unifrom (at Merchant Navy training college). It was as Lightoller described, "like a thousand daggers being stuck in," :shock: but that sensation only lasted a second or two. I think it was caused by the water reaching me through my thick uniform in hundreds of differnt points. Then a second later, they all joined up and I quickly became very numb. Having got myself out (without assistance) I was surprised how soon I warmed up again, despite having a ten-minute walk back to the college!
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Re: First Officer Murdoch

Postby Achmet Pamba » Thu Aug 15, 2013 4:14 pm

In my younger days I fell through the ice on a nearby lake and was there for some time before my friends managed to pull me out, but my experience appears to have been much more painful than yours.
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Re: First Officer Murdoch

Postby shipbuilder » Thu Aug 15, 2013 7:04 pm

What were your physical sensations? What age? And what were you wearing? I was 17 at the time and clad in a thick uniform made of doeskin, like they would be wearing when Titanic sank. It always remained a minor incident in my mind, but afterward, I always felt confident that if I ever got into a freezing sea owing to my ship sinking, I would be capable of surviving simply because I knew what it was like. Fortunately, it was never put to the test.
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Re: First Officer Murdoch

Postby Achmet Pamba » Fri Aug 16, 2013 1:57 am

I was fourteen and was wearing a winter jacket and (I believe) blue jeans when the ice gave way underneath me, and it took perhaps ten or fifteen minutes before my friends were able to borrow a length of clothesline from someone on shore and haul me out of the water. Anyway, after the initial shock of the cold water (the "thousand knives" that you and Lightoller described), my main memory is of my skin burning and my limbs aching and trying to cramp up from the intense cold, and I also kept gasping for air because I couldn't seem to get enough oxygen into my lungs. Even though I was pretty much recovered by the end of the day, it was an experience I hope I'll never have to repeat (not at my present age, anyway...) :-)
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Re: First Officer Murdoch

Postby shipbuilder » Fri Aug 16, 2013 6:27 am

That sounds like a very bad experience, probably made worse by the fact you were in the water a lot longer than I was. I do now remember gasping for air, but after the inital shock, my first reactions were to get out as quickly as possible. But with the Titanic, it was probably a lot colder and I wonder if anyone even lasted ten minutes in it.
But I would imagine that Murdoch was so engrossed in getting people into the boats quickly that he didn't give any thought to shooting himself. I haven't studied the incident in any depth, but I really wonder if their revolvers had real bullets in them. It is far more likely they had blanks and were intended to discourage rather than kill. I can't imagine any shipping company arming their officers in that way. May be wrong, of course as I don't really know!
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