Food Aboard Passenger and Cruise Ships

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Re: Food Aboard Passenger and Cruise Ships

Postby shipbuilder » Wed Jun 13, 2012 12:43 pm

I can only compare then with the passenger ship companies that I sailed with - Union-Castle and St. Helena Shipping. The menus I have seen were in Walter Lord's "A Night To Remember." The 2nd class menu looks OK, but the 1st Class one just does not have the choices that I would have expected for 1st class. Same goes for the lunch menu on MAURETANIA, 1934 - shown above. In the TITANIC menu, they even had Corned Beef listed! Now, I love corned beef, but I have never seen it on a passenger ship menu. Also Mutton Chops - doesn't sound as good as Spring Lamb (that was on the 2nd class TITANIC menu!)!
Another thing that was never on the menu in the Castles was things like Fish & Chips, Sausage, Egg & Chips, etc, but they were available from the chip shop on the REINA DEL MAR, but they were not printed anywhere. We did have informal "Fish & Chip" suppers on deck in the ST. HELENA. The food on the ST. HELENA was very much simpler than the menus I have shown above, but it appealed to me more than all that fancy stuff on the Castles.

Boat Drills
I always assumed that Boat Drill was compulsory for passengers on all passenger ships after WWII, maybe even belore. But I don't think passenger were allotted lifeboats at all. They went to various muster points and would be directed from there to the most suitable boats in case of emergency. The reason for this was if the ship had a heavy list, the boats on the high side may not be able to be launched at all.

They weren't inconvenienced long at boat drills. After they had been checked and counted at their muster stations, they could go, but the rest of us carried on for over an hour. Our boat drills in Cape Town Harbour when all the passengers had disembarked were long, wearisome affairs that involved lowering all the port lifeboats into the dock, jammed to capacity and beyond with crew memebers. An interesting point was that in the Castles, all the ships company from captain had to watch "A Night To Remember" starring Kenneth More as a lesson in how to behave correctly. We had special showings in the cinemas and had to sign to say we had seen it!

Any crew member who had more than six months sea time, was expected to study for and pass the lifeboat examination. That included all the female staff, stewardesses, stewardettes, female officers etc. Mine is attached. There were literally hundreds of us with this certificate (Total ship's company 400 on the WINDSOR CASTLE)
Bob
Attachments
Lifeboat Cert (Large).jpg
Lifeboar Certificate
Lifeboat Cert (Large).jpg (292.41 KiB) Viewed 4974 times
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Re: Food Aboard Passenger and Cruise Ships

Postby VW1956 » Wed Jun 13, 2012 5:36 pm

Hello Denise and Bob. I have had the question of how were they able to plan all the meals and get the menus printed up before they left on my mind for years. And now I know how they did it. Thanks. I mentioned on a thread last year (or the year before that) about how many pictures there must be hidden away in lofts and garages. There must have been tens of thousands of people with cameras on liners from 1910 to 1960. Which could mean there were easily 250,000 pictures taken. Most by now will have been thrown away but there must still be many thousands still to turn up. Ken.
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Re: Food Aboard Passenger and Cruise Ships

Postby shipbuilder » Wed Jun 13, 2012 9:13 pm

Ken
I am sure you are right about the photographs. I took hundreds & hundreds when I was at sea and developed most of them myself (black & white) but only ever printed a small number. Now, I can scan the negatives and print them from the computer, but it would still take me years to get through them all. There must be thousands and thousands stored away somewhere and forgotten about, but they do continue to turn up from time to time! Still on the subject of food, here is head chef David Stroud carving the huge joint of roast beef for dinner on deck in the tropics aboard the RMS ST. HELENA about 20 years ago. It took all day to cook and we called it the "steamboat round!" The ship is still in service.
Bob
Attachments
David Stroud, Chef carves the joint for the deck barbeque (Medium).jpg
Dinner on deck. Carving the joint.
David Stroud, Chef carves the joint for the deck barbeque (Medium).jpg (44.03 KiB) Viewed 4964 times
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Re: Food Aboard Passenger and Cruise Ships

Postby VW1956 » Thu Jun 14, 2012 2:13 pm

Hello Bob. That last picture you posted, is that outside in the open? I have been on a ship just the once but I can relate to the pictures in this thread of what it was like at meal times. That joint of roast beef looks so good that I could eat it now. Ken.

PS. If you do get time to post up some pictures after you have scanned them then that would be great. Ken.
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Re: Food Aboard Passenger and Cruise Ships

Postby shipbuilder » Thu Jun 14, 2012 3:09 pm

Yes, it was oustide, we were off the coast of West Africa and the barbeque started at about 2000, by which time it was dark, but we were illuminated by the deck lights. Here is another picture at barbeque on deck. captain doing a bit of limbo dancing! This is on the old ST. HELENA, the previous picture was on the new one!
We had many regular passengers that preferred sailing with us (3,150 tons and only 300 feet long) to sailing in the big ships!
The other picture is wife and I at deck barbeque in the old ship in 1987 (our honeymoon voyage)
Bob
Attachments
Author & Wife Christine Barbeque night (Medium).JPG
Myself & Wife
Author & Wife Christine Barbeque night (Medium).JPG (53.3 KiB) Viewed 4954 times
Purser Colin Dellar encourages Captain Smith at Limbo Dancing (Medium).jpg
Barbeque on deck
Purser Colin Dellar encourages Captain Smith at Limbo Dancing (Medium).jpg (77.56 KiB) Viewed 4955 times
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Re: Food Aboard Passenger and Cruise Ships

Postby wruth03@aol.com » Thu Jun 14, 2012 7:21 pm

Hi Bob those pictures are great. It really looks fun and everyone looks to be having a good time. I have always thought that the Titanic lacked any really fun activities like a barbecue. Yes listening to the band would be nice but I would have thought that the whole trip would be so much shorter if you had fun activities and had a laugh with the other passengers. Going back to the menus I cannot say mutton chops really appeal to me I have to say I am not a fan of mutton. I like lamb but mutton to my taste lacks flavour. So I see what you mean about Titanic having a better menu for second class than first. Also I had not realised that they had fish and chip shops on some ships. What a great idea because you do not really want fancy food all the time. One other thing of interest in the charity shop where I work we have a pack of playing cards for sale from the Union Castle Shipping Line. I noticed them today and I immediately thought of you and the the Reina Del Mar. We had them valued and were told to put £12 on them.
Denise
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