The Lives and Deaths of Ships

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The Lives and Deaths of Ships

Postby MAB » Thu Jan 03, 2013 2:45 am

On 3 January 1901 Runic II (Capt C. H. Kempson) began her maiden voyage, from Liverpool to Australia via Cape Town, the route on which she spent her entire White Star career.
Runic II (Photo).JPG
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Re: The Lives and Deaths of Ships

Postby Aly Jones » Thu Jan 03, 2013 11:16 am

Thanks for posting.

She is a very small ship even for her time.
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Re: The Lives and Deaths of Ships

Postby VW1956 » Thu Jan 03, 2013 1:31 pm

Hello MAB. Do you know why White Star (and other lines) went to the expense of fitting 4 masts to a ship that was steamed powered. I can understand the need for 2 masts as any radio aerials could be hung from them but why the extra 2? Ken.
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Re: The Lives and Deaths of Ships

Postby MAB » Thu Jan 03, 2013 4:05 pm

Aly Jones wrote:Thanks for posting.
Quite welcome.
She is a very small ship even for her time.
No, she wasn't. At the time she was the largest ship on the England-to-Australia service and, of White Star's existing fleet, only Oceanic II and Cymric were larger. Her maiden trip to Australia received quite a bit of attention in the press; look here.
VW1956 wrote:Do you know why White Star (and other lines) went to the expense of fitting 4 masts to a ship that was steamed powered.
Until the advent of twin-screws, the masts remained rigged for sail to be used in the event the engine or screw broke down. After that, it was just tradition.
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Re: The Lives and Deaths of Ships

Postby MAB » Sun Jan 06, 2013 1:42 am

On 6 January 1885 Doric I (Capt. J. W. Jennings) left London on her first trip in the White Star/Shaw, Savill & Albion joint service to Wellington, via the Cape of Good Hope outbound and Cape Horn inbound. (Since entering service in July 1883 Doric had sailed on the same route on charter to the New Zealand Shipping Co. but with White Star commanders.) Doric remained on the New Zealand service until 1895, when she was placed on the White Star/Occidental & Oriental transpacific service.
doric I SFC 02271896.jpg
The San Francisco Call, 27 February 1896
Retrieved from the California Digital Newspaper Collection web site,
http://cdnc.ucr.edu/cdnc/cgi-bin/cdnc?a=p&p=home
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Re: The Lives and Deaths of Ships

Postby Aly Jones » Mon Jan 07, 2013 4:22 am

No, she wasn't. At the time she was the largest ship on the England-to-Australia service and, of White Star's existing fleet, only Oceanic II and Cymric were larger. Her maiden trip to Australia received quite a bit of attention in the press;


She was one of the largest ships afloat in 1901, as you say. No wonder captains had trouble/difficulties adjusting to new larger vessels that consisted of over 45,000 tons.

How many tons were these ships? Were these passengers ships?
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Re: The Lives and Deaths of Ships

Postby MAB » Mon Jan 07, 2013 4:39 am

Aly Jones wrote:How many tons were these ships?
Runic was about 12,500; Belgic, 4,200.
Were these passengers ships?
Yes.
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Re: The Lives and Deaths of Ships

Postby MAB » Fri Jan 11, 2013 11:54 pm

On 12 January 1894 Cevic (Capt. R. Nicol), the world's largest freighter, began her maiden voyage, from Liverpool to New York. Cevic served on that route until 1908; from then until the beginning of World War I she was on White Star's Australian service, with a handful of North Atlantic crossings thrown in.
cevic photo.JPG
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Re: The Lives and Deaths of Ships

Postby MAB » Mon Jan 14, 2013 8:40 pm

On 14 January 1904 Canopic (Capt. E. Maddox) began her first White Star sailing, from Liverpool to Boston. From there she entered White Star's new Boston-Mediterranean service and remained there until 1914. (Canopic entered service in 1900 as the Dominion Line's Commonwealth and was transferred from Dominion to White Star in 1903, together with Boston-Mediterranean route on which she had been serving.)
Canopic0002.JPG
On 14 January 1914 Majestic I (Capt. F. Beadnell) began her final voyage, from Southampton to New York. After her return she was sold for breaking up.
majestic i.JPG
On 14 January 1933 Gallic II (Capt. Burd) began her final White Star voyage, from Antwerp to Australia and New Zealand. After her return to England in May she was sold to the Clan Line and renamed Clan Colquhoun. Sold three more times after World War II, the ship was scrapped in 1956.
Gallic II.JPG
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Re: The Lives and Deaths of Ships

Postby MAB » Wed Jan 16, 2013 4:58 pm

On 16 January 1889 Republic I (Capt. E. J. Smith) left Liverpool for Queenstown and New York on her final voyage for White Star. Later in 1889, Republic was sold to Holland America and renamed Maasdam; still later, she was sold several more times and had several other names before being broken up in Genoa in 1910.
republic i.JPG
On 16 January 1903 Ionic II (Capt. J. B. Ranson) began her maiden voyage, from London to Wellington, in White Star's joint service with Shaw, Savill & Albion. Ionic spent her entire White Star career on the New Zealand service.
Ionic II0001.JPG
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Re: The Lives and Deaths of Ships

Postby MAB » Thu Jan 17, 2013 10:30 pm

On 17 January 1941 the former White Star tender Traffic II, in service as a German convoy escort based at Cherbourg, was sunk in the English Channel by a British torpedo. (Traffic had been sold by White Star to the Compagnie Cherbourgeoise de Transbordement in 1927, after White Star was bought by the Royal Mail Group, and was sold again in 1934, to the Société Cherbourgeoise de Remorquage et de Sauvetage, and renamed Ingenieur Riebell. When German forces occupied Cherbourg in 1940, Ingenieur Riebell was seized and placed in Kriegsmarine service.)
traffic ii.JPG
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Re: The Lives and Deaths of Ships

Postby MAB » Sun Jan 20, 2013 4:37 am

On 20 January 1925 Pittsburgh began her final White Star voyage, from Antwerp to New York with calls at Southampton and Cherbourg; when she left New York on 5 February she was on Red Star Line service although still registered to the Leyland Line and bearing an American Line name. Renamed Pennland in 1926, she was sold to Arnold Bernstein in 1935; after Bernstein was arrested by the Nazis Pennland was sold to Holland America in 1939 and chartered to the British Ministry of War Transport in 1940, without a change of name. She was bombed and sunk in the Gulf of Athens in 1941.
Pittsburgh0001.JPG
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Re: The Lives and Deaths of Ships

Postby MAB » Wed Jan 23, 2013 4:14 am

On 23 January 1909, while en route from New York to Madeira and Naples, Republic II (Capt. I. Sealby) was rammed by Lloyd Italiano's Florida in fog off Nantucket; she sank the next day. Six deaths resulted, three Republic passengers and three Florida crew members. Republic's and Florida's remaining passengers were rescued and taken to New York by Baltic II (Capt. J. B. Ranson), which responded to CQD messages sent by Jack Binns, the wireless operator on Republic; Florida was towed to New York by a U.S. revenue cutter.
Republic II0001.JPG
On 23 January 1921: Haverford (Capt. Jones) arrived at Philadelphia from Liverpool to complete her first White Star sailing after being transferred from the American Line, for which she had entered service in 1901.
Haverford.JPG
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Re: The Lives and Deaths of Ships

Postby MAB » Fri Jan 25, 2013 4:12 am

On 25 January 1917 armed merchant cruiser Laurentic I (Capt. R. A. Norton, R. N.), en route from Liverpool to Halifax, hit two mines laid by U 80 and sank in 125 feet of water off Lough Swilly. All of the crew who survived the mine explosions were evacuated before the ship sank, but many of them died of exposure after safely entering lifeboats; all told, only 121 of the 475 on board survived. Also on board was £5 million in gold, to pay for Canadian munitions; between 1919 and 1924, all but 25 out of the 3211 gold bars were recovered.
laurentic i0001.JPG
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Re: The Lives and Deaths of Ships

Postby MAB » Tue Jan 29, 2013 5:23 am

On 29 January 1873 Gaelic I (Capt. J. W. Jennings) left Liverpool on her maiden voyage, bound for Valparaiso, Chile. After the South America steamer service was discontinued that summer, Gaelic spent the next two years sailing to New York---sometimes from Liverpool, sometimes from London---and in 1875 was placed on the White Star/Occidental transpacific service, where she spent the rest of her White Star career.
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